Gaming Performance: 720p and Lower

All of our game testing results, including other resolutions, can be found in our benchmark database: www.anandtech.com/bench. All gaming tests were with an RTX 2080 Ti.

For our gaming tests in this review, we re-benched the Ryzen 7 5800X processor to compare it directly against the newer Ryzen 7 5800X3D on Windows 11. All previous Ryzen 5000 processor were tested on Windows 10, while all of our Intel Alder Lake (12th Gen Core Series) testing was done on Windows 11.

We are using DDR4 memory at the following settings:

  • DDR4-3200

Civilization VI

(b-1) Civilization VI - 480p Min - Average FPS

(b-2) Civilization VI - 480p Min - 95th Percentile

Final Fantasy 14

(d-1) Final Fantasy 14 - 768p Min - Average FPS

Final Fantasy 15

(e-1) Final Fantasy 15 - 720p Standard - Average FPS

(e-2) Final Fantasy 15 - 720p Standard - 95th Percentile

World of Tanks

(f-1) World of Tanks - 768p Min - Average FPS

(f-2) World of Tanks - 768p Min - 95th Percentile

Borderlands 3

(g-1) Borderlands 3 - 360p VLow - Average FPS

(g-2) Borderlands 3 - 360p VLow - 95th Percentile

Far Cry 5

(i-1) Far Cry 5 - 720p Low - Average FPS

(i-2) Far Cry 5 - 720p Low - 95th Percentile

Gears Tactics

(j-1) Gears Tactics - 720p Low - Average FPS

(j-2) Gears Tactics - 720p Low - 95th Percentile

Grand Theft Auto V

(k-1) Grand Theft Auto V - 720p Low - Average FPS

(k-2) Grand Theft Auto V - 720p Low - 95th Percentile

Red Dead Redemption 2

(l-1) Red Dead 2 - 384p Min - Average FPS

(l-2) Red Dead 2 - 384p Min - 95th Percentile

Strange Brigade (DirectX 12)

(m-1) Strange Brigade DX12 - 720p Low - Average FPS

(m-2) Strange Brigade DX12 - 720p Low - 95th Percentile

Strange Brigade (Vulcan)

(n-1) Strange Brigade Vulkan - 720p Low - Average FPS

(n-2) Strange Brigade Vulkan - 720p Low - 95th Percentile

At 720p resolutions and lower, we are significantly (and intentionally) CPU limited. All of which gives the Ryzen 7 5800X3D and its 3D-Vache the chance to shine.

The addition of 3D V-Cache to one of AMD's mid-range chips makes the Ryzen 7 5800X3D a much more potent option in gaming, with much better performance consistently than the Ryzen 7 5800X. This is very much a best-case scenario for AMD, and as we'll see, won't be as applicable to more real-world results (where being GPU limited is more common). But it underscores why AMD is positioning the chip as a gaming chip: because many of these workloads do benefit from the extra cache (when they aren't being held-back elsewhere).

In any case, the 5800X3D compares favorably to its more direct competition, the Intel Core i9-12900K and Ryzen 9 5950X (which are both more expensive options). In AMD partnered titles, the Ryzen 7 5800X3D does extremely well.

The AMD Ryzen 7 5800X3D Review Gaming Performance: 1080p
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  • nandnandnand - Thursday, June 30, 2022 - link

    Great results for the 5800X3D in Dwarf Fortress and Factorio. Clearly it does not have enough cache for the World Gen 257x257 test. Reply
  • dorion - Thursday, June 30, 2022 - link

    It shows the exceptional predictors in Intel's architecture, they don't have 96MB of L3 cache either(duh) and yet they whip that world generator. Wonder what odd coding of Tarn's the CPUs are butting against. And exceptional amount of civilizations and monsters to simulate for 550 years in the 257x257 world? Reply
  • AndreaSussman - Sunday, July 31, 2022 - link

    Hello Reply
  • Samus - Thursday, June 30, 2022 - link

    Also impressive is how much the cache improves WinRAR performance. Going from last to 2nd place - with a lower clock speed Reply
  • nandnandnand - Thursday, June 30, 2022 - link

    Compared to some of the earliest reviews like Tom's, this one found more productivity/code scenarios where the extra cache helps it edge out over the 5800X, despite the lower clock speed. Obviously there are niches where the 5800X3D will do really well, like the workloads that Milan-X can boost by >50%. You won't usually see them all in one review. Reply
  • DanNeely - Sunday, July 3, 2022 - link

    WinRAR has always been extremely dependent on memory performance. That a huge cache benefits it isn't a big surprise. Reply
  • emn13 - Monday, July 11, 2022 - link

    Sure, but it's more than just memory performance that's an issue here: in very abstract principle compressors need to find correlation across broad swaths of memory. It's actually not at all obvious whether that's cache-friendly; and indeed in 7-zip it appears not to be.

    After all, if your compression context significantly exceeds the L3 cache, then that cache will largely be useless. Conversely, if your window (almost) fits within the smaller L3-cache, then increasing its size is likely largely useless.

    The fact that this helps WinRAR but not 7-zip is not obvious. Given the compression ratio differences, I'm going to assume that 7-zip is using more context, and thus can't benefit from "just" 96MB of cache. And perhaps that WinRAR at higher settings (if it has any?) wouldn't either.

    That does make me curious how the 3d-vcache impacts the more high-throughput compressors such as zstd or even lz4 perhaps.
    Reply
  • brucethemoose - Friday, July 1, 2022 - link

    Just wanna say I am ecstatic over the DF/Factorio tests. Stuff like that is where I'm most critically CPU bottlenecked these days, as opposed to CPU Blender or Battlefield at 720p.

    I'd like to suggest Minecraft chunk generation as another test (though its a bit tricky to set up). Expansive strategy/sim games like Starsector, Rimworld, Stellaris and such would also be great to test, but I don't think they're fully automatable.
    Reply
  • 29a - Tuesday, July 5, 2022 - link

    I’d also be interested in a Stellaris benchmark. Reply
  • ballsystemlord - Thursday, June 30, 2022 - link

    @Gavin , is it just me, or do you have two sets of identical WoT Benchmarks at 1080p? BTW: I'm looking at the print view. Reply

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