As part of Intel’s batch of announcements today, including Broadwell on the desktop and Thunderbolt 3, the 47W laptop/mini-PC processors that were also launched offers an interesting talking point. These are essentially the drop in models for current high end Haswell laptops, offering manufacturers an upgrade path before Intel’s 6th Generation, Skylake.

The five SKUs are:

Intel 47W Broadwell Lineup
  i7-5950HQ i7-5850HQ i7-5750HQ i7-5700HQ i5-5350H
Price $623 $434 $434 $378 $289
Cores 4 4 4 4 2
Threads 8 8 8 8 4
Base CPU Freq. 2.9GHz 2.7GHz 2.5GHz 2.7GHz 3.0GHz
Turbo CPU Freq. 3.7GHz 3.6GHz 3.4GHz 3.5GHz 3.5GHz
Graphics Iris Pro 6200 (GT3e) Iris Pro 6200 (GT3e) Iris Pro 6200 (GT3e) HD 5600
(GT2)
Iris Pro 6200 (GT3e)
EUs 48 48 48 24 48
iGPU Freq. 1150MHz 1100MHz 1105MHz 1050MHz 1050MHz
TDP 47W 47W 47W 47W 47W
DRAM Freq.
(DDR3L / LPDDR3L)
1600MHz / 
1866MHz
1600MHz / 
1866MHz
1600MHz / 
1866MHz
1600MHz / 
1866MHz
1600MHz / 
1866MHz
L3 Cache 6MB 6MB 6MB 6MB 4MB
L4 Cache 128MB (Crystal Well) 128MB (Crystal Well) 128MB (Crystal Well) None 128MB (Crystal Well)
Interface BGA BGA BGA BGA BGA

The clear odd one out here is the i7-5700HQ, already announced in some laptops, which holds HD 5600 graphics whereas the rest are on Iris Pro 6200 with Crystal Well and have an extra 128 MB of eDRAM that acts as an L4 cache. The i5 is also the lower SKU coming with two cores and four threads, suggesting that this is a disabled die to satisfy yields rather than a native dual core design. Pricing is appropriate, with the i5 also getting only 4MB of L3 cache but a higher base frequency than some of the quad core variants.

We have 47W Broadwell based laptops inbound for review, but the interesting element in this is that Apple recently updated their Macbook Pro line but decided not to wait for the official Broadwell announcement. It is a little unclear why, but the i7-4770HQ and i7-4870HQ variants would match up nicely (with speed bumps) to the i7-5750HQ and i7-5870HQ as they are both listed at the same price.

Source: Intel

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  • chubbypanda - Wednesday, June 3, 2015 - link

    Intel ITP (see https://designintools.intel.com/product_p/itpxdp3b... ), usually used by tier 1 OEM/ODM only. Reply
  • ZeDestructor - Friday, June 5, 2015 - link

    You pair it with one of these: https://designintools.intel.com/product_p/itptopsi... (CPU pads to weird connector adapter). Not just OEMs/ODMs either: Some kernel developers need it - the guys working on core bringup/init/memory management code by and large. Reply
  • MrSpadge - Tuesday, June 2, 2015 - link

    ... not to forget access to the NSA backdoors ;) Reply
  • ZeDestructor - Wednesday, June 3, 2015 - link

    I highly doubt there are any. These interfaces are similar to what you'd use JTAG on an embedded SoC for: getting access to each cycle of the processor and tracing that (and all the related memory and cache access), instruction by instruction. Also stopping the CPU, and stepping, line by line through the assembly. Very useful when you have a bug in your kernel, debuggers don't work (because you've got a bug in the kernel) and it doesn't show up in the emulator. Reply
  • ZeDestructor - Wednesday, June 3, 2015 - link

    Oh, and these interfaces can only be access physically, which is useless for the NSA, who want remote, invisible access. Also, If you have physical access, you don't really need a backdoor in the CPU to begin with. Reply
  • En1gma - Tuesday, June 2, 2015 - link

    ppfffff... no socket variants.. Reply
  • ExarKun333 - Tuesday, June 2, 2015 - link

    Wrong. Read the other review... Reply
  • close - Tuesday, June 2, 2015 - link

    When it comes to laptops BGA is the norm. There are fewer and fewer chassis that can house a socket due to the added height. So as long as a part is for laptops I don's really see a good upgrade opportunity. Reply
  • En1gma - Tuesday, June 2, 2015 - link

    ok..
    no socketed mobile variants.. so i'll have fewer options when buying a new mainstream gaming laptop. unfortunately for quite a while gpu are soldered (not mxm) in mainstream gaming laptops
    Reply
  • ImSpartacus - Tuesday, June 2, 2015 - link

    I think we're past the point where it makes sense to upgrade a laptop cpu. At least there are socketed desktop options. Reply

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